99% Food, 1% Skin

Cauliflower Salad (v2), Hungry for Change and Karma

I have wine jelly that I never quite know what to do with, and decided to make a different dressing for the cauliflower salad.

WP_20130804_002

1 head of cauliflower, cut them in small pieces

3 small tomatoes, diced

1 tbsp olive oil

1 tbsp vinegar (I used a strawberry balsamic vinegar)

1 tbsp of capers

1 tbsp of wine jelly

black pepper

Bring water to boil.  Cook cauliflowers until boil.  Allow the vegetables to boil for another minute after they come to boil.

Drain vegetables and rinse with cold water.

Whisk olive oil, vinegar, wine jelly, capers and black pepper together.  Mush the capers to release flavor.

Toss cold vegetables and tomatoes with dressing.


Stumbled into “Hungry for change” on Netflix.  Turned out to be an informative and enjoyable film.  It consisted of series of responses from doctors, health food expert, nutritionist and people who had gone through diets.  In the beginning segment, the film talked about what were the bad food ingredients and what they did to our body.  Then, they talked about what foods were good for the body, including detox.  The part I liked most was that it explored the psychological and emotional roles in eating.

Some part of the movie felt a little repetitive, and a little fear-mongering.  All in all was a decent movie and it certainly brought a reminder to myself to eat better (even though I know better, sometimes I succumb to my craving for yummy food that are not necessarily good!)

I am a supporter of Kiva.  It is a non-profit organization working on promoting and connecting lending opportunities for folks in poverty-stricken countries.  I have been involved with microloans through Kiva for more than 5 years and just re-lend the same money that I put in 5 years ago to other parties in need.  I like the fact that I can read about who I choose to lend to and in which sector of the industry these folks are in.  My passion is food, and I focus on lending to folks in agriculture or food.  Kiva also provides information on risk ratings of the field partners on the loan receiving end.  As lenders, we can decide how much risk we want to be involved.

I like the idea of microloan as I feel it is a sustainable way to help someone getting on their feet or through rough times.  The recipients are doing earnest hard work.  I see the money I put in as donation which I have to manage occasionally (when folks pay lenders back, lenders can decide what to do with their money again!  There is the choice that a lender can withdraw money when he/she does not want to lend anymore).

Leave a Reply